Latest News from Outsiders Inn

Homeless memorialized at church in Vancouver

St. Paul Lutheran Church holds annual service on first day of winter to honor dead

AdamKravitz memorial SamuelWilson TheColumbian

By Patty Hastings, Columbian Social Services, Demographics, Faith

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When people gathered on the steps in front of St. Paul Lutheran Church on Wednesday night, it was foggy and 33 degrees. A few dozen people were there to honor those who have died while homeless.

Memorials are held in cities around the country on Dec. 21, the first day of winter and the longest night of the year. It’s a chance to memorialize people who maybe haven’t been properly memorialized and give thanks for their time on earth, said Tom Iberle, who heads the Friends of the Carpenter.

It was fitting that the memorial happened at St. Paul in Vancouver, which provides overnight shelter for men during the winter months. Some clients joined in the memorial before going inside to stay the night.

Iberle read off a list of 10 people with local connections who died while homeless this year. The list included the newborn daughter of a homeless couple.

There wasn’t a lot of information about the deceased — one person’s name wasn’t available, and for others their date of death was hazy — but that speaks to what happens when a person dies while homeless. It can be difficult to track them, document their deaths properly and recognize them.

One of the deceased was a man who frequented the Friends of the Carpenter in west Vancouver. Donald Prickett Jr. died in October in Reedsport, Ore., but was homeless for a while in Vancouver. He had many health problems and eventually reconciled with family in Reedsport, Iberle said. While he was going to the Friends of the Carpenter and doing woodworking projects, Prickett mastered scroll-saw techniques.

“I got to know Donald very well when he lived here in Vancouver,” Iberle said. “He turned out amazing works of art while living out of the back of his truck.”

The list of those who have died is longer than Adam Kravitz can remember from past homeless memorials.

“That should scare us. That should really scare us,” he said.

At previous memorials, Kravitz said, he knew the deceased because he knew them from when he was homeless. At Wednesday’s memorial, he knew the deceased because he tried to work with them through his outreach organization Outsiders Inn.

“It utterly amazes me that we expect people to burrow out of homelessness. It is literally like climbing a mountain that keeps going and going,” Kravitz said.

Vancouver has come a long way in recognizing and addressing homelessness, he said, but it still has a lot to work on in the coming year. Thousands of people in the community help out, and he encouraged people to continue doing good work.

“I have seen love go to the streets more than ever in Vancouver,” he said. “I want to continue that. I want to pump that up. I want you guys to be angry. I want this to be the last memorial.”

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Judge: Clark County liable for clearing out homeless camps

County must pay for belongings lost in clearing encampments

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TACOMA — A federal judge in Tacoma has found Clark County liable for seizing the residents’ belongings when it cleared out homeless encampments.

In a ruling Friday, Judge Robert Bryan said the county’s inmate work crews violated the constitutional rights of at least a half-dozen homeless residents by throwing out their tents, stoves, medication, documents and photographs during sweeps from 2012 to 2014. A trial is set for Oct. 3 to determine how much the county must pay in damages, but settlement talks are also planned.

“The only evidence in the record is that the county’s employees took all unattended property and then immediately destroyed the property, regardless of whether the property was abandoned,” the judge wrote.

He declined to immediately rule on the merits of claims by two other campers, saying it wasn’t clear who took their property.

One hour’s notice

In March 2012, the Clark County Department of Corrections adopted a policy that work crews should clean up camps immediately if they’d been abandoned. If they hadn’t been abandoned, it said, the workers were to give one hour’s notice that the residents had to vacate the area and take their belongings with them.

In practice, the crews often didn’t determine whether the property had been abandoned. One crew supervisor testified in a deposition that if his workers complained that a campsite appeared to be recently occupied, he ordered them to clean up, anyway.

A lawyer for the county did not immediately return an email seeking comment Friday.

Some campers left to eat meals at a local shelter, then returned to find the work crews seizing their property and refusing to give it back. Among the items taken were dentures, a photograph of a deceased child, and legal documents such as Social Security cards and disability insurance papers.

A homeless resident, Terry Ellis, left a backpack at a bus stop while he offered to help a woman whose car had broken down nearby. Even though Ellis was within sight when the work crew arrived, the crew took it, ignoring his explanation for why he left it there, Ellis said in court filings.

Inside the backpack were new clothes he had been given so he could apply for a job, he said.

Another plaintiff and formerly homeless man, Adam Kravitz, had briefly left his bags by the Columbia River in 2012 and returned to find work crews taking them away. Kravitz and the group he was with asked the men to leave, but they were threatened with arrest, court documents show. Kravitz did not protest any further from there, he said.

Kravitz recently launched a nonprofit called Outsiders Inn to advocate for Clark County’s homeless community, and said it was incidents like these that spurred him to action. Friday’s ruling was “a big win,” he said.

“I’m very glad that they acknowledged that they were in the wrong,” he said. “I really hope, moving forward, that the policies can be strengthened and adhered to even better.”

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Unhoused Residents Association advocates on its own behalf

Group, which meets once a month, gives homeless a voice

AdamKravitz NatalieBehring TheColumbian

By Patty Hastings, Columbian Social Services, Demographics, Faith

Published:

There are neighborhood associations for most every area in Clark County, but what about people without an address?

The new Unhoused Residents Association looks to empower homeless people in Clark County by making them an officially recognized group that can advocate on its own behalf. In February, the association began holding monthly town hall meetings at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in west Vancouver.

Outsiders Inn, a homeless advocacy group, formed the association; meetings are facilitated by founder Adam Kravitz. He said he is a more effective advocate when he hears the most relevant, current concerns from people who are living on the streets.

“That’s why we do this. Everybody gets a voice, and everybody gets to be heard,” he said. “The magic of these meetings is bringing people together and the collaboration that’s going to happen.”

Kravitz is a new board member at Share, which operates shelters in Clark County, so he is able to offer institutional knowledge and relay what’s happening at the nonprofit organization to the Unhoused Residents Association members. Ren Autrey, also of Outsiders Inn, keeps minutes during the meetings.

Fliers for the association read: “No decisions about us, without us!”

Judi Bailey, neighborhoods program manager at the city of Vancouver, said neighborhood associations are geographically defined and are officially recognized by city ordinance. That means that those without an address cannot form a neighborhood association. The Unhoused Residents Association would be considered a sort of stakeholder group, she said, similar to Bike Clark County or the Clark County Rental Association.

“It’s more a group that’s connected by interest than geographical location,” Bailey said.

K.C. Vee, who lives out of his van with his wife, attended the group’s second meeting on March 10. The 40-year-old said he isn’t sure if politicians will listen to him about his concerns but they would be more apt to listen to a reputable organization, whether it’s Outsiders Inn or the Unhoused Residents Association. He is concerned about the negative perception of the homeless, he added.

“This isn’t just a bunch of people sitting around whining about being homeless,” Vee said. “We want to change our circumstance.”

Danny Hessick said he heard about the meetings at Friends of the Carpenter and a volunteer with the nonprofit group drove him to the meeting at St. Luke’s. The 47-year-old said he likes that the gatherings give him a chance to let other people know what he is feeling.

Also in attendance were representatives from agencies that assist the homeless, including 211Info, the Arnada Abbey, Hands of Favor and His Presents.

Seeking solutions

Many topics were covered at the two-hour meeting on March 10.

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