Latest News from Outsiders Inn

SAFE PARK | Go Connect

08 Jan 18 16It is estimated that in every school district across the country, for every 10,000 students there are 20 families who have no other choice, but to sleep in their cars.  That means there are about 65,000 families living in transition waiting for a permanent place to stay.

Churches are the only place to park legally for over 2 weeks.  Our systems make it possible for churches to offer this kind of service to their communities.


From the https://goconnect.org/safepark/ webpage:

"Faith communities desire to respond to the growing reality that individuals, couples and families from our local communities are sleeping in their vehicles as the only option for housing.

Over 300 family units have been identified as living in their vehicles within the first few months of 2017.  As parents strive to care for their family they are faced with the problem of having a place to park their vehicle safely and legally.  County code states that people cannot reside in parking lots overnight, even private parking lots.

Luckily, State and Federal permits faith communities to use their property (including parking lots) and their resources to carry out their mission.  Church parking lots are one of the only places where people can park and stay overnight legally.  No, Locally Walmart does not allow it anymore.

We are supporting congregations who are opening their parking lots who are offering hospitality to those living in their cars. Our solution is simple. Local churches opening their parking lots to families who are living transitionally out of their vehicles.

SafePark Process

  1. A family calls the Housing Solution Hotline at 360-695-9677.
  2. An intake is completed and a background check is completed for everyone in the family over 18 years of age.
  3. Our volunteer coordinator is notified of new placements.
  4. A volunteer is present at the first arrival to provide a parking permit.
  5. Guests can arrive around 7pm and depart before 8:00am.

 

Program Resources

The Pocket Guide, Resources & Tips for Surviving on the Streets, Vancouver

Winter 2017-2018 version released!   

Pocket guidefrom the Council for the Homeless website:

"Local advocates for people who are homeless and living outside created a Pocket Guide featuring practical tips for survival and finding assistance. Led by community advocate and volunteer Lois Smith, the Pocket Guide offers important tips for safety, finding resources, and surviving during different types of weather. Two unique features about the Pocket Guide are:

  1. People who live outside or have lived outside contributed to the content of the Pocket Guide. Additional input came from social service providers. Practical tips include “place crumpled newspaper in the bottom of your sleeping bag to stay warm” and “don’t lay tarp directly on your tent; create a lean-to over the tent to keep it dry.”

  2. The Pocket Guide is printed on waterproof and tear proof paper. It is also folded and small enough to fit in a pocket or other small space. Lois and the team of volunteer advocates (Jamie DeForest Spinelli, Wendy Bukoski, Shelly Gaylor, Lonnie Klugman, and Tom Eaton) worked for six months on the project. Phil Verry, a local graphic designer, charged a reduced rate for his services to the project. Council for the Homeless sponsored the cost of the design and printing. The team designed a specific distribution plan that focuses on community service agencies sharing the Pocket Guides primarily with the newly unsheltered who may be struggling with where to go and how to survive. Groups interested in distributing the Pocket Guides should contact Lois Smith directly.

The Pocket Guide is available throughout Clark County. To ask for distribution sites or request a printed copy of the Pocket Guide, please contact Lois at 360-326-3970.

Online version of the Pocket guide here

original post: http://www.councilforthehomeless.org/pocket-guide/

Read about the success of the Pocket Guide and how the first version informed the second!

 

Memorial Service for the Homeless at St. Paul Lutheran Church

17 in ’17: Service pays tribute to county’s homeless who died

HomelessMemorialService2017 image columbian 1

 

By Andy Matarrese, Columbian Breaking News Reporter

Published:

Vancouver City Council Member Ty Stober addressed the crowd gathered at the steps of St. Paul Lutheran Church Thursday night, and said something that came to him while he was thinking for what to share with the other mourners was the idea of stories.

The crowd held candles, sang and mourned together Thursday night to honor the estimated 17 people, according to organizers, who died while homeless in Clark County in the past year.

Stober said someone recently told him “those people” who hang around or use the Share House, a homeless shelter downtown, don’t contribute to the community. The notion broke his heart, he said.

“You think about the butterfly effect,” he said, the idea that small causes can have larger effects, or a butterfly’s flapping wings can lead to a tornado on the other side of the world.

Last year, when people gathered to mourn the previous year’s unsheltered dead, they didn’t know Ronald Heubner, who was homeless, would, the very next day, no longer be with them, Stober said.

They didn’t know Sungok Park, who had just found housing in time to be diagnosed with cancer, would die a few days later. Nor did anyone think they’d be without all the other names on the list, each one someone’s friend or family member.

“Each and every one of us has a story and each and every one of us has an impact on the world around us,” Stober said. “They were all butterflies. They all flapped their wings, they all made tornadoes happen in other parts of the world. So let’s remember that tonight.”

Adam Kravitz, another advocate, founded Outsiders Inn, a Vancouver-based homeless advocacy and services organization.

He said he started speaking up for homeless people while he, too was homeless. His logic, he said, was someone had to speak up for these people, and for this year’s vigil, he thought it would be appropriate to share some stories from those still outside and struggling.

“It is really about stories,” he said. “It is really about each individual. It is really about looking people in the eye and smiling and giving them hope.”

He shared what people told him:

• ” ‘Stop looking at me, and look at me like this,’ and he smiled.”

• ” ‘We’re humans, not homeless.’ ”

• ” ‘The numbers have grown and nothing has changed.’ That was repeated about 15 times.”

• ” ‘There is no magic pill, even if you do everything right, and follow every step in the book, it’s still hurry up and wait. You have no choice. You have to camp. But who can camp at night and work by day with laws so strict that you lose what little scraps you have saved. Oh that’s right, pretty much no one can do it, at all. So it feels like a lie, no one will treat you with respect, even when you do everything right.’ ”

• ” ‘You never even talk to me, not one time. Everybody thinks you know me. That’s bull crap.’ ”

• ” ‘Someone spat on me, and then someone else gave me a leather jacket, all in the same five minutes. I can’t stand this world.’ ”

These people deal with traumatic living situations daily, Kravitz said, and he praised the efforts of every volunteer and service group trying to help, saying it truly has saved lives.

Still, he said, again, the numbers are growing and little is changing.

Tom Iberle, executive director at the Friends of the Carpenter social services nonprofit, read aloud the names this year.

The honored this year included Heubner, Park, Roger S. Wilson, Jake Talley, Richard Waller, Joey Sigman, Dennis Lynch, Kevin Lisman, Raymond Bartley, Matt Solop, James Martin, Randy LeRoy, Michael Holmes, Roberty Sargent, Daniel L. Smith, Eric Studer and one unidentified man.

“In many cases, this service will be the only commemoration of their lives,” Iberle said.

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly listed where Outsiders Inn is based. The homeless advocacy group was founded and operates in Vancouver.

http://www.columbian.com/news/2017/dec/21/service-pays-tribute-clark-county-homeless-who-died-2017/